Fort Henry (1000 islands)

Built during the war of 1812 to protect against an American attack on a strategic and elevated location, nearby the Ontario Lake, the Cataraqui River which flows to the St. Lawrence River and the Rideau Canal. Restoration work on the fort from 1832 to 1837 led to a second fort been built on the site of the first. The fort was occupied by British troops and then by Canadian troops until 1891. During the first and second world wars, it housed prisoners of war. Today, it is considered a National Historic Site and a World Heritage Site. The museum lets you experience a mid-1860 appearance and military life.

Address: 1 Fort Henry Dr, Kingston, K7K 5G8, ON

Region: Ontario

Drive: 3 hours south-west from Montreal. Exactly halfway between downtown Montreal and downtown Toronto.

Parking: Free

Entry fee: $10 from the age of 4 years old +

Opening time: mid-May to the end of October, usually 10:00 to 17:00 (check exact dates and times online).

Self guided walking tour or participate in a 50 minute guided tour, offered hourly. French / English tour options.

Restaurants: yes, a canteen option and a restauant

Few souvenir shops at the entrace to the fort

Suitable for a baby stroller

Fort Henry

Park and circle the fort’s walls to reach the entry point, nearby the restaurant and the souvenir shops. Check guided-tour hours and shows of the day. Once you pay, you’ll receive a bracelet to enter the fort. Enter through the narrow alley which leads to the large court. During our visit, there were packs of hay and pumpkin decorations. However, kids are not allowed to climb on the hay.

We chose the self-tour, walking through the different floors and rooms. We spent about 3 hours there including lunch.

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Example of daily events: IMG_5781IMG_5780IMG_5782IMG_5785IMG_5788

The different rooms have a wide variety of British and Canadian military artifacts.

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The fort guard demonstrated a rifle shooting along with an explanation about the different rifles used at the fort.

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Keep in mind that during our visit (September 2018) there were lots of restoration work at the fort (which were not mentioned on the site’s website). Especially at the top part of the fort with the river’s viewpoints.

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