Huron-Wendat Museum and Kabir Kouba Waterfall

The place to learn about the Huron-Wendat First Nations history. Wendake is a reservation of the Huron-Wendat and is located in the La Haute-Saint-Charles borough of Quebec City. Just 30 minutes from Quebec City you will find this beautiful reservation, with a great walk to see Kabir Kouba waterfall and the Huron-Wendat Museum.

Address of the hotel / museum: 5 Place de la Rencontre, Wendake, QC G0A 4V0

Region: Capitale-Nationale

Car: from Montreal about 2h50. From Quebec City 30 minutes

Entry fees: museum prices (from website, 2017): Different packages available, kids 0-5 have free access, museum offers rates for teens, students, seniors and family

Parking at the museum: Free

This walk is not suitable for baby strollers as there are many stairs on the pathway

Museum Huron Wendat

Chute Kabir Kouba – French website

Tourism Wendake – English

We started the day at the parking of the hotel/museum (point 7 on the map). At the hotel, there is a tourist information center. Grab a map and start the walk.

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Walk along the street ‘Riviere du Serpent’ until you reach a junction with a church (Eglise historique Notre-Dame-de-Lorette). Along the way, there are very nice decorative plantings (vegetal Art). Point 3 (‘Place de la  Nation’) is where the walk along St Charles (Akiawenrahk) River starts. The Kabir Kouba Fall plunges into a 42 meters deep canyon. It measures 28 meters. Close to the waterfall, there are ruins of a flour mill, a sawmill and a paper mill which were built in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The pathway of Parc Lineaire de la Riviere-Saint-Charles is wooden with many steps along the way. The first part you descend and towards the end of the walk along the river, there are many steps climbing up to reach the second viewpoint of the river and waterfall. Once you exit the wooden steps, you reach a small amphitheatre which leads to the main street Boulevard Bastien. Walking down the street, you will see a few local souvenir shops with First Nations artifacts. You will reach the first starting point (church) where you should continue towards Boulevard des Etudiants and cross the bridge. Once on the bridge, you will see a big wall art (number 4 on the map – Fresque du People Wendat). Pass the bridge and look for the sign to turn right (don’t be confused with few private properties on the way). This part is a continuation of the Parc Lineaire de la Riviere-Saint-Charles. The walk is again along the river and about 200 meters from the bridge on the path, you will find a great playground for kids; one playground for smaller kids and the other for older kids. Nearby there is a small water park where kids can play in the water. In order to return to the car or the museum, continue 100 meters on the path until you reach a cycling path (Corridor des Cheminots). Cross the cycling bridge and you will see the hotel.

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The Museum is located inside the boutique spa hotel surrounded by beautiful gardens. It was inaugurated in 2008, the Huron-Wendat Museum is an institution created to protect and promote the heritage of the Wendat people. The museum exhibits permanent and temporary exhibitions. You can get an audio guide to listen to the explanations about the exhibits in different languages.

Adjacent to the museum’s garden, you will find the National Longhouse Ekionkiestha’. Once or twice a day there is a guided tour. Opening days change so it is worth giving a call to the museum to check or look at their website. The longhouse is a very impressive structure and it is worth visiting. Inside you will see a traditional home of First Nations and the place where they used to live.

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